Webinar: Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites

Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites (Rowman & Littlefield, 2017) encourages us to put an "H" (the humanities, not just history) into a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subject – a STEATH approach. During this webinar, Dr. Reid will summarize main points from Interpreting Agriculture,  including an overview of different disciplinary methodology useful to interpreting agriculture (sciences, social sciences, and humanities), and then case studies of interpreting agricultural machinery using a social history and humanist approach. Reid will summarize a critical thinking approach that uses visual evidence (prescriptive literature and photographic evidence) to document agricultural tools and equipment). The session will continue with a conversation among participants about how they will document agriculture in their location (be if farms in the countryside or the city, or agricultural business that served farm families historically and today). The session will conclude with a discussion about what else museums and historic site staff need to interpret agriculture most effectively, and will end with a question and answer session.

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Details:

Date: September 26, 2017

Time: 3pm Eastern/2pm Central/1pm Mountain/12pm Pacific/10am Hawaii/4pm Atlantic

Cost: $40 members/$65 nonmembers

Closed captioning available upon advanced notice. Please contact [email protected] for more information.

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About the Instructor:

Dr. Debra A. Reid is Curator of Agriculture and the Environment, The Henry Ford (Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation and Greenfield Village), Dearborn, Michigan. She has worked with living history farms, agricultural museums, and historic sites in Maine, Massachusetts, New York, Wisconsin, Ohio, Texas, and taught Historical Administration and History at Eastern Illinois University (1999-2017). Her service to the profession has included leadership roles in three international organizations devoted to agriculture: the Association for Living History, Farm and Agricultural Museums (ALHFAM), the International Association of Agricultural Museums (AIMA), and the Agricultural History Society. Thus, she has a breadth of understanding about agriculture across the United States, and in European and African contexts. Her research addresses rural and minority cultures, and her duties at The Henry Ford allow her to put machinery collections into social, cultural, and historical context.


Interpreting Anniversaries and Milestones at Museums and Historic Sites

This Interpreting Anniversaries and Milestones at Museums and Historic Sites webinar will provide a wealth of ideas to jump start your anniversary planning.  Everyone has an anniversary coming up – why reinvent the wheel?  Learn from what others have already accomplished in their own communities. This webinar will discuss why people are drawn to celebrating and commemorating anniversaries in their own lives and in their communities, as well as the institutional benefits of planning this type of programming.  Then we will explore case studies of specific institutions that have planned and executed an anniversary celebration or commemoration, including Signature Events; Programs and Tours; Fundraising Campaigns; Exhibitions, Books and Documentaries; Audience Outreach and Community Involvement; Preservation; Partnerships; and Commemorative Products and Souvenirs.  Every idea can be scaled up or down, depending on your resources.

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Details:

Date: August 8, 2017

Time: 3pm EST/2pm Central/1pm Mountain/12pm Pacific/10am Hawaii

Cost: $40 members/$65 nonmembers

Closed captioning available upon advanced notice. Please contact [email protected] for more information.

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About the Instructor:

Kim Kenney graduated summa cum laude from Wells College in Aurora, NY with a major in American history and minor in creative writing, where she became a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She earned her Master of Arts degree in History Museum Studies at the Cooperstown Graduate Program. Kim became Curator of the McKinley Presidential Library & Museum in October 2001.  She is the author of six books: Canton: A Journey Through Time, Canton’s West Lawn Cemetery, Canton’s Pioneers in Flight, Canton Entertainment, Interpreting Anniversaries and Milestones at Museums and Historic Sites, and Through the Lens: The Photography of Frank Dick. Her work has appeared in The Public Historian, the journal of the National Council for Public History; White House History, the journal of the White House Historical Association; The Repository; The Boston Globe; Aviation History; and the literary magazine Mused.  She serves as editor of the Museums website at BellaOnline.com, where she has authored several ebooks, and is a member of the MuseLab Advisory Council at Kent State University.  She has appeared on The Daily Show, First Ladies: Influence & Images, and Mysteries at the Museum.  Her program “The 1918 Influenza Pandemic” was featured on C-SPAN’s series American History TV.  Kim has served as the Region 5 representative for the National Digital Newspaper Project in Ohio, a field reviewer for the Museums for America grant program through the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and a grant reviewer for The History Fund.  She is an adjunct faculty member at the University of Mount Union and teaches online museum studies courses through the Northern States Conservation Center.  She was awarded the Oakley Certificate of Merit from The Association of Gravestone Studies for her interpretive projects at West Lawn Cemetery and the Jane Weston Chapman Award from the University of Mount Union for her dedication to women’s history programming.


Interpreting LGBT History at Museums and Historic Sites

This webinar will provide an introduction to interpreting LGBT history at museums and historic sites. We will discuss first steps in planning LGBT interpretive efforts, which include: deciding if the time is right for your organization to interpret LGBT history; approaching the sources; conceptualizing your story; and trust-building. Drawing on numerous case studies, Dr. Ferentinos will offer a range of success stories and suggest what we can learn from these examples.

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Details:

Date: May 4, 2017

Time: 3pm EST/2pm Central/1pm Mountain/12pm Pacific/10am Hawaii/4pm Atlantic

Cost: $40 AASLH Members/$65 Nonmembers

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About the Instructor:

Susan Ferentinos is a public history researcher, writer, and consultant, whose specialties include inclusive interpretation and project management for historical organizations. She is the author of Interpreting LGBT History at Museums and Historic Sites (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015), which is part of the AASLH "Interpreting History" series and was the winner of the 2016 National Council on Public History book award. She also contributed a chapter to the recently released National Park Service Theme Study in LGBTQ History and is currently working on numerous LGBTQ history projects for the park service. Find Susan at www.susanferentinos.com and on Twitter: @HistorySue.

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Webinar: Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites

This Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites webinar will provide an introduction to strategies for using food and food history to develop interpretation with depth and significance, making relevant connections to contemporary issues and visitor interests. Join Michelle Moon and AASLH as we discuss how the field can better use our love of food to share our love of history.

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Details:

Date: February 21, 2017

Time: 2 pm central/ 3 pm eastern

Cost: $40 members/$65 nonmembers

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Full Description:

Food is such a friendly topic that it’s often thought of as a “hook” for engaging visitors to museums and historic sites—a familiar way into other topic, or a sensory element to round out a living history interpretation. But food is more than just a hook—it’s a topic all its own, with its own history and its own uncertain future, and deserving of a central place in historic interpretation. With audiences more interested in food than ever before, and new research in food studies bringing interdisciplinary approaches to this complicated but compelling subject, museums and historic sites have an opportunity to draw new audiences and infuse new meaning into their food presentations.

This Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites webinar will provide an introduction to strategies for using food and food history to develop interpretation with depth and significance, making relevant connections to contemporary issues and visitor interests. Join Michelle Moon and AASLH as we discuss how the field can better use our love of food to share our love of history.

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About the Speaker: 

aaeaaqaaaaaaaaqaaaaajde4owuwmdg1lwu4zgutndmyzc05ndu4ltm5ntm2owrkmgzmmaMichelle Moon oversees adults learning and develops interpretation at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts. She’s the author of Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites, published by AASLH in 2015.


Webinar: Interpreting Slavery: Building a Theoretical Foundation

Do you interpret the institution of slavery or the lives of enslaved people at your historic site/museum? Join us as we share the theoretical underpinnings for interpreting slavery, including how contested narratives and race play a role in the giving/receiving of interpretation. This webinar will help you achieve a greater understanding of the difficult knowledge and complicated emotions surrounding this complex history.

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