White text runs horizontally across a black and white photo of marching protesters holding signs, placards, and drums, protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Webinar: History Check-In: Native American Activism

In this History Check-in webinar, Dr. Philip Deloria (Dakota) provides an overview of Native American activism. This webinar is part of the History Check-In webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). Each webinar in this series is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.

Participant Outcomes:

  • Participants will develop an understanding of the range of political philosophies and strategies that have characterized Native American activism, including protest, public address, written appeals, petitions, legal work, ally-ship, among others.
  • Participants will develop an understanding of the long trajectory of activism, within and against distinct strategies of landtaking and settler colonialism.
  • Participants will be able to link understandings of the breadth and depth of Indian activism to specific recent manifestations, including the American Indian Movement and the Standing Rock resistance.

Details:

DATE: Tuesday, December 11, 2018

TIME: 3:00 – 4:15 pm EASTERN (Remember to adjust for your time zone!)

COST: $20 Members of AASLH, OAH, & ATALM (OAH & ATALM members should contact their membership associations for a discount code) / $30 Non-members

Closed captioning available upon advanced notice. Please contact learn@aaslh.org for more information.

REGISTER HERE

Speaker:

ImagePhilip Deloria (Dakota) is a professor of history at Harvard University. His research and teaching focus on the cultural and ideological intersections of Indian and non-Indian worlds. His first book, Playing Indian (1998), traces the tradition of white "Indian play" from the Boston Tea Party to the New Age movement, while his Indians in Unexpected Places (2004) examines the ideologies surrounding Indian people in the early twentieth century and the ways Native Americans challenged them through sports, travel, automobility, and film and musical performance. He is a coeditor, with Neal Salisbury, of The Blackwell Companion to American Indian History (2001) and, with Jerome Bernstein, of C.G. Jung and the Sioux Traditions (2009) by Vine Deloria Jr. His most recent book, coauthored with Alexander Olson, is American Studies: A User's Guide (2017), which offers a comprehensive treatment of the historiography and methodology of the field of American Studies. Prior to joining the faculty at Harvard, Deloria taught at the University of Colorado and at the University of Michigan where he also served as the associate dean for undergraduate education and directed the American culture and Native American studies programs. He is a trustee of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian, where he chairs the Repatriation Committee; a former president of the American Studies Association; and an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is currently completing a project on American Indian visual arts of the mid-twentieth century and coediting, with Beth Piatote, "I Heart Nixon: Essays on the Indigenous Everyday."


Webinar: History Check-In: Immigration and Citizenship During The World War I Era

In this History Check-in webinar, Michael Innis-Jiménez provides an overview of immigration and citizenship during the World War I era with an emphasis on Mexican immigration. Just as immigration and racialized immigrants are at the forefront of today’s national political discourse, Innis-Jiménez will explain why the debate about immigrants and immigration was influential in shaping discourse during the earlier era. This webinar will also outline the push and pull influences in the changing immigration patterns and discuss how Mexican immigration to the U.S. influenced the broader, post-World War I immigrant demographics. This webinar is part of the History Check-In webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). Each webinar in this series is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.

Details:

DATE: Monday, November 5, 2018

TIME: 3:00 – 4:15 pm EASTERN (Remember to adjust for your time zone!)

COST: $20 Members of AASLH and OAH (OAH members should contact OAH for a discount code) / $30 Non-members

Closed captioning available upon advanced notice. Please contact learn@aaslh.org for more information.

REGISTER HERE

Description & Outcomes:

Participant Outcomes:

After this webinar, participants will:

  • Be able to explain and evaluate the major themes and developments of immigration to the United States in the World War I era.
  • Be familiar with political and social influences on immigration patterns to the United States in the World War I era.
  • Be able to trace the influence of historical Mexican immigrant stereotypes on immigration.

Speaker:

Michael Innis-Jiménez has a PhD in history from the University of Iowa. He is associate professor and director of graduate studies in the department of American Studies at the University of Alabama.  I have also served as a consultant and team member with the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute’s Latino New South Project and consultant with the Levine Museum of the New South (Charlotte, NC), the lead museum of the Latino New South Project’s three-museum consortium.  Innis-Jiménez’ books include Steel Barrio: The Great Mexican Migration to South Chicago, 1915-1940 (NYU Press, 2013) and Made in Chicago: Mexican Food, Tourism, and Cultural Identity (under contract with the University of Texas Press, in progress). Both books focus on the World War I through interwar periods.


Webinar: History Check-In: Women's Suffrage

 

This AASLH webinar presents a general introduction to the history of woman suffrage in the United States, contextualized by its involvement with other movements for democracy and equality across the sweep of American history. This webinar is part of the History Check-In webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). Each webinar in this series is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.

Details:

DATE: Tuesday, October 23, 2018

TIME: 3:00 – 4:15 pm EASTERN (Remember to adjust for your time zone!)

COST: $20 Members of AASLH and OAH (OAH members should contact OAH for a discount code) / $30 Non-members

Closed captioning available upon advanced notice. Please contact learn@aaslh.org for more information.

Register Here

 

Description & Outcomes

In this webinar, Susan Ware presents a general introduction to the history of woman suffrage in the United States, timed to coincide with the many commemorative events planned around the centennial of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment on August 26, 2020. Its organizing theme is "the long Nineteenth Amendment."  Just as historians talk about a long nineteenth century stretching from the American Revolution through the early twentieth century, or a long civil rights movement that predates the activism of the 1950s and 1960s, a focus on the long Nineteenth Amendment allows us to start the story before the iconic Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 and extend it beyond the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920.  Among other outcomes, this broader approach to suffrage history puts women's struggle for the vote in conversation with other movements for democracy and equality across the sweep of American history.

Participant Outcomes:

  • familiarity with the main themes and major players of the national suffrage movement
  • awareness of regional differences:  how the story played out on state and local levels, with special attention to the South and West
  • an understanding of the central role of race in the woman suffrage movement, both the active roles played by African American suffragists and the evidence of racism on the part of white women in the movement
  • a framework for linking the suffrage movement to contemporary events by not seeing 1920 as a hard stop or the end of the story, but as part of a continuum of ongoing and contested questions about gender, citizenship, and the vote.

Speaker:

A blond woman with bangs and round glasses smiles at the camera. She wears a sweater and scarf, is visible from slightly below the shoulders, and stands in front of a brick windowed building.A pioneer in the field of women’s history and a leading feminist biographer, Susan Ware is the author and editor of numerous books on twentieth-century U.S. history. Educated at Wellesley College and Harvard University, she has taught at New York University and Harvard, where she served as editor of the biographical dictionary Notable American Women: Completing the Twentieth Century (2004). Since 2012, she has served as the general editor of the American National Biography, published by Oxford University Press under the auspices of the American Council of Learned Societies. Ware has long been associated with the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and is currently writing a book of suffrage stories inspired by its collections.

 

 

Register Here


History Crash Course: Immigration in a Changing America

Immigration has always been a major driver of both change and debate in U.S. history. This webinar - organized by the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota and led by historian, author, and IHRC Director Erika Lee, IHRC Program Coordinator Saengmany Ratsabout, and Immigrant Stories Project Manager Dr. Elizabeth Venditto - will introduce key themes in immigration history and the main issues that historians are considering in today’s highly-charged climate. In particular, we will use the IHRC's #ImmigrationSyllabus which provides historical context to current debates over immigration reform, integration, and citizenship as our guide. Participants will also learn about the IHRC’s Immigrant Stories project to engage with diverse local communities. A digital storytelling and archiving project, Immigrant Stories helps immigrants and refugees create digital stories: brief videos with images, text, and audio about a personal experience and is a successful community engagement tool. The rich collection can also be used for teaching, learning, and exhibits.

Register

Details:

Date: August 2, 2017

Time: 3pm Eastern/2pm Central/1pm Mountain/12pm Pacific/10am Hawaii/4pm Atlantic

Cost: Free to All

Closed captioning available upon advanced notice. Please contact mitchell@aaslh.org for more information.

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About the Immigration History Research Center

Founded in 1965, the University of Minnesota’s Immigration History Research Center is the oldest and best-known research center devoted to understanding immigrant and refugee life in North America in both the past and present. Along with its partner, the IHRC Archives (University Libraries), it is the oldest and largest interdisciplinary research center and archives devoted to preserving and understanding immigrant and refugee life in North America. We promote interdisciplinary research on migration, race, and ethnicity in the United States and the world through monthly seminars and research grants. We connect US immigration history research to contemporary immigrant and refugee communities through our Immigrant Stories project. We advance public dialogue about immigration with timely programs that draw audiences from around the corner and around the world. We support teaching and learning at all levels, and develop archives documenting immigrant and refugee experiences for future generations.

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About the Speakers:

Erika Lee is an award-winning American historian, Director of the Immigration History Research Center, and the Rudolph J. Vecoli Chair in Immigration History at the University of Minnesota. Her scholarly specialties include migration, race and ethnicity; Asian Americans; transnational U.S. history; and immigration law and public policy. She is the author of three award-winning books, including At America’s Gates: Chinese Immigration During the Exclusion Era, 1882-1943, Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America, and The Making of Asian America: A History.

 

 

 

Saengmany Ratsabout is Program Coordinator at the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. He holds an M.A. in Southeast Asian Studies and a Master of Liberal Studies. Saengmany has over 16 years of experience working with immigrant and refugee communities.

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Venditto is the Immigrant Stories Project Manager at the Immigration History Research Center. She holds a PhD in migration history from the University of Minnesota.

 

 

 

The History Crash Course Webinar Series is produced in partnership with the Organization of American Historians. We invite you to find out more about OAH by visiting their website here.

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History Crash Course: The American Experience in World War I

This lecture webinar will offer a brief overview of current scholarship on the American experience in World War I, the key challenges facing smaller historical organizations seeking to mount exhibits on the war, some strategies for placing objects in their proper historical context, and ways to underscore the relevance of WWI for American society today.

Details:

Date: March 28, 2017

Time: 3pm EST/2pm Central/1pm Mountain/12pm Pacific/10am Hawaii

Cost: Free to all

Register

About the Lecturer:

Jennifer D. Keene is a professor of history and chair of the History Department at Chapman University. She is a specialist in American military experience during World War I.  She has published three books on the American involvement in the First World War: Doughboys, the Great War and the Remaking of America (2001), World War I: The American Soldier Experience (2011), and The United States and the First World War (2000).  She is the lead author for an American history textbook, Visions of America: A History of the United States that uses a visual approach to teaching students U.S. history. She is also a general editor for the “1914-1918-online,” peer-reviewed online encyclopedia, http://www.1914-1918-online.net/, a major digital humanities project.

 

The History Crash Course Webinar Series is produced in partnership with the Organization of American Historians. We invite you to find out more about OAH by visiting their website here.