2015 AASLH Annual Meeting

The Power of Possibility

Nothing can replace the opportunities that arise when yo intersect with people coming together around common goals and interests, in our case, good history and good times.

In 2015, the AASLH Annual Meeting in Louisville invites us to explore The Power of Possibility in Louisville, KY

We all know that history organizations continue to operate in a highly challenging environment. How do we demonstrate, encourage, and inspire the Power of Possibility within the realm of history organizations and far beyond?

Join us as we find ways to blend what appear to be opposite extremes and we navigate boundaries and barriers, ultimately unlocking the Power of  Possibility!

Learn more

Top Ten Reasons For Visiting Kentucky and Louisville

Anything is possible in Kentucky…even Bigfoot sightings…and Louisville is excited to host the AASLH Annual Meeting September 16-19. Here are some tidbits to prepare you to visit the Bluegrass State for the conference:

Top Ten Reasons For Visiting Kentucky and Louisville:

kentucky-postcard10. The song “Happy Birthday to You” was written in Louisville by two local sisters, Mildred J. and Patty Smith Hill.

9. In 1873, Louisville druggist John Colgan invented chewing gum (he called it “Taffy Tolu”).

8. The replica of Babe Ruth’s 34-inch Louisville Slugger bat weighs 68,000 pounds, is made of steel, stands 120 feet tall, and is located at the Louisville Slugger Museum.

7. 100,000 Mint Juleps are poured during the Kentucky Derby and Kentucky Oaks each year.

Mint Julep d22 Dan Dry low res6. Duncan Hines isn’t just a cake mix—he’s a real person. Born in Bowling Green in 1880, he was a pioneer of restaurant ratings for travelers.

5. During the Civil War, Frankfort was the only Union capital occupied by Confederate troops.

4. Despite being famous worldwide for bourbon, Kentucky’s official state beverage is milk.

3. Both Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis were born in Kentucky and less than 100 miles and one year apart.

2. The largest collection of Victorian homes in the United States and the third largest historically preserved district in the United States is located in Old Louisville.

1. 95% of the world’s bourbon is produced in Kentucky. Coincidentally, 90% of the United States’ disco balls are also produced in Louisville each year.

ColourfulDiscoBall

History organizations continue to operate in a highly challenging environment, and it’s useful to be reminded that there are multiple ways to achieve one’s mission.

Join us as we find ways to blend what appear to be opposite extremes and navigate boundaries and barriers, ultimately unlocking the Power of Possibility!

To register and learn more about the exciting sessions, events, workshops, and tours, please visit http://about.aaslh.org/conference/


Save the Date for the 2015 AASLH Annual Meeting

Save the Date!IMG_5389

2015 AASLH Annual Meeting
Louisville, Kentucky
September 16-19

Registration Opens by June 1

Nothing can replace the opportunities that arise when you intersect with people who come together around common goals and interests — good history and good times. In 2015, the AASLH Annual Meeting in Louisville explores “The Power of Possibility!”

Featured Speakers

  • Sam Wineburg – Thursday Keynote Address
  • Author Wendell Berry and Kentucky State Historian Dr. James C. Klotter moderated by KET personality Renee Shaw – Friday Keynote Address
  • Carol Kammen – Awards Banquet Speaker

Visit http://about.aaslh.org/conference/ for more information about hotel rooms, the theme and more.


AASLH Issues 2015 Call for Proposals

The American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) will present its 2015 annual meeting in Louisville, KY, from
September 16-20.

AASLH is now accepting proposals for sessions and workshops.

Louisville_02_Moberly Photography

2015 Annual Meeting Theme: The Power of Possibility

Just as Louisville’s growth and success spring from the barriers faced by Ohio River travelers at the Falls of the Ohio, the power of possibility allows the public history field to see opportunities instead of obstacles. Momentum is building once again! So, how do we demonstrate, encourage, and inspire the Power of Possibility within the realm of history organizations and far beyond?

We all know that history organizations continue to operate in a highly challenging environment. Those organizations that keep within the boundaries and simply repeat past procedures, programs, and operations continue to fall behind. Those who identify the spaces of possibility and adjust strategies make inroads to the future.

At our peril, we implement change by forcing the questions of either public programs or academic research, either contemplative or participatory experiences, content versus skills development, and either existing membership or new audiences. If we truly intend to survive and positively impact the future, we need to reject the exclusionary phrase “either/or” and move in the direction of “and.” We can be both creative and disciplined, consistent and fresh, informative and fun.

As they like to say in Louisville, “It’s possible here.” Join us as we find ways to blend what appear to be opposite extremes and we navigate boundaries and barriers, ultimately unlocking the Power of Possibility!

In the spirit of this theme, the Program Committee seeks proposals that:

  • Demonstrate innovative approaches to telling the stories of ordinary people doing extraordinary things
  • Illustrate activity that is unusual, innovative and creative—even if it didn’t work
  • Introduce provocative ideas for discussion
  • Encourage public involvement in our work, connecting history to everyday life
  • Reflect and feature diverse settings and people
  • Connect personal and community histories to larger themes
  • Promote organizational review and revitalization

Deadline for session proposals is November 17.

Learn more on submitting a session and how to submit online.