Workshop: Creating Programs for Teachers and Students

Workshop Description

Through a combination of presentations, discussion, hands-on activities, and take-home materials, this workshop addresses the elements of museum education and programming needed to create engaging, educational, and successful educational programming for students and teachers. Learn how to craft on site and outreach programming that is meaningful to the education community. This workshop was formerly called "Connecting Your Collections to Teachers and Students."

Topics include:

  • Learning Theory
  • Onsite Programming
  • Outreach Programming
  • Working with Educators
  • Advocating for Education at Your Organization

 

Details

FORMAT: In-person group workshop

LENGTH: Two days (9:00 am – 5:00 pm)

DATE: June 24 – 25, 2019

LOCATION: The Bullock Museum, 1800 Congress Ave. Austin, TX 78701

MATERIALS: Workshop materials will be provided upon registration and in-person at the event.

COST: $230 AASLH members/$345 nonmembers

** Save $40 when you register by May 24, 2019 and use promo code EARLYBIRD19 at checkout! **

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Scholarships

Participants of this workshop may be eligible for an AASLH Workshop Scholarship. Each year AASLH offers scholarships to four individuals in the history field to attend an AASLH onsite workshop. Recipients of the New Professional Workshop Scholarship and Diversity Workshop Fellowship receive registration fee reimbursement for one AASLH workshop and one year Individual Membership in AASLH. Registration for 2019 Workshop scholarships is now open. The deadline to apply is March 1, 2019.

APPLY

 

Who Should Attend This Workshop

This workshop is ideally suited for staff (first-time museum educators, directors, tour guides or volunteer managers and mid-career professionals), museum studies students, or dedicated volunteers working in all types of museums who are given the responsibility of education and public programming.

 

Instructors

Stacia Kuceyeski is the Director of Outreach at the Ohio History Connection. Stacia provides high quality professional development for cultural heritage professionals as well as a K-16 audience in a variety of humanities content areas and learning theories. She has presented and published for a number of organizations including the American Association of State and Local History, the Midwest Archives Conference and the Teaching American History Project Directors’ Conference. Stacia also has extensive grant writing experience and has received funding from a variety of national, state and local foundations and granting agencies. Luckily, her grant writing abilities far surpass her singing, drawing and poetry writing skills. When not making professional development magic happen, Stacia enjoys the Golden Girls, sassy earrings and an unnatural affection for our 27th president, William Howard Taft. Stacia earned her B.A. in History and her M.A. in Cultural Policy and Arts Administration, both from The Ohio State University.

 

Megan Wood is the Director of Museum and Library Services at the Ohio History Connection. Megan has over a decade of experience in museums and public history. She has a MA in History Museum Studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program and a BA in Public History from Western Michigan University.


Book Review: Teaching with Primary Sources

This review originally appeared in the Winter 2019 issue of History News.

Teaching with Primary Sources
By Christopher J. Prom and Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe (eds.)
(Chicago: Society of American Archivists, 2016)
Reviewed by Marietta Carr

Primary sources have long been a critical piece of the curricula at all levels of education, but recent changes to education standards, approaches to teaching, and library and archives services have increased the demand for robust instructional services and access to archival collections. Archivists have responded with creativity, variety, and pragmatism in meeting their communities’ teaching and learning needs. Teaching with Primary Sources, edited by Christopher J. Prom and Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, gathers some of the struggles archivists have faced and the solutions they have developed in delivering instructional services. The book is divided into three modules. Each module focuses on different aspects of the topic, ranging from theoretical frameworks to case studies and example assignments. As Hinchliffe explains in her introduction, the book is designed as a primer for instruction in academic archival contexts, but can be applied to cultural heritage organizations generally and used by busy educators looking for inspiration for impending primary source instruction sessions.

The first module lays out a theoretical framework of archival literacy and relates it to concepts and literacies commonly addressed in teaching and education literature such as information literacy, assessment, and domain knowledge. The second module moves into more practical ground by proposing solutions to possible barriers to teaching with archival materials. While the first module gives archivists the terminology and conceptual background necessary to engage with faculty, the second module is a how-to guide for implementing instructional services. The module includes tips for identifying resources like time and professional development, communicating with administrators and faculty, and creating lesson plans. The third module explores common themes expressed in case studies and interviews with archivists, college faculty, and a high school teacher. This module includes examples of assignments and class tools that can be adapted to each reader’s institutional situation.

Teaching with Primary Sources is an excellent overview of this trend in archival practice, especially for archivists with little formal teaching experience or training. Each module includes an appendix with suggestions for further reading so interested readers can delve further into the topic. There are several recurring themes that appear in each module. Perhaps the most prevalent theme is the authors’ emphasis on building relationships with educators. The authors point out that one of the most common instructional services is a single session within the context of a larger course. Strong collaborative relationships with faculty will make these sessions more effective and create opportunities to develop other types of instructional services. For example, one archivist reported that the professors he worked with revised their course learning objectives in response to feedback from archives staff. This theme also highlights two of the book’s weaknesses: a predominant concern for academic archival settings and a lack of input from K-12 teachers. The authors draw primarily from their own experiences as archivists in higher education institutions and interviews with other archivists and faculty.

While the academic archivist will benefit most directly from the authors’ advice, the book is written with the larger cultural heritage environment in mind and the authors’ solutions can be adapted to non-academic institutions. Online tools such as tutorials for accessing and citing materials can encourage college students to use non-academic archives. Creating programs for students in newer initiatives such as massive open online courses (MOOCs) and co-curricular programs in colleges’ education departments can benefit both the cultural heritage organization and the academic institution. The authors stress that selecting the right materials significantly impacts educators’ success in integrating primary sources into their curriculum or museum programming. For example, items with unique provenance or preservation histories will engage students and adult audiences and enable significant learning experiences. Educators must have clear and limited objectives for what they expect the audience to learn when working with their primary sources, recognizing that many individuals will likely lack necessary analytical skills such as visual literacy.


Marietta Carr is the College Archivist at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, OH. She holds an M.L.I.S from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.A. in History from Northeastern University, and can be reached at marietta.carr@tri-c.edu.

Are you interested in contributing reviews to History News? Apply here.


Workshop: Connecting Your Collections to Teachers and Students

Through a combination of presentations, discussion, hands-on activities, and take-home materials, this workshop addresses the elements of museum educational and programming  needed to create engaging, educational, and successful collections-based programming.

Register

Date: June 22-23, 2017

Cost: $280 AASLH members/$405 nonmembers
*Get $40 off registration if you book by May 18, 2017!*

Location: George Mason's Gunston Hall, Mason Neck, VA

Register

Description:

Through a combination of presentations, discussion, hands-on activities, and take-home materials, this workshop addresses the elements of museum educational and programming  needed to create engaging, educational, and successful collections-based programming. Learn how to craft programming that is meaningful to the education community.

Topics include learning styles, presentation strategies, audience types, planning strategies, program assessment, research, and staff training.

Who Should Attend:
This workshop is ideally suited for staff (first-time museum educators, directors, tour guides or volunteer managers and mid-career professionals), museum studies students, or dedicated volunteers working in all types of museums who are given the responsibility of education and public programming.

Register

About the Faculty:

07acd61Stacia Kuceyeski is the Director of Outreach at the Ohio History Connection. Stacia provides high quality professional development for cultural heritage professionals as well as a K-16 audience in a variety of humanities content areas and learning theories. She has presented and published for a number of organizations including the American Association of State and Local History, the Midwest Archives Conference and the Teaching American History Project Directors’ Conference. Stacia also has extensive grant writing experience and has received funding from a variety of national, state and local foundations and granting agencies. Luckily, her grant writing abilities far surpass her singing, drawing and poetry writing skills. When not making professional development magic happen, Stacia enjoys the Golden Girls, sassy earrings and an unnatural affection for our 27th president, William Howard Taft. Stacia earned her B.A. in History and her M.A. in Cultural Policy and Arts Administration, both from The Ohio State University.

 

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Megan Wood is the Director of Museum and Library Services at the Ohio History Connection. Megan has over a decade of experience in museums and public history. She has a MA in History Museum Studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program and a BA in Public History from Western Michigan University.

 

 

 

This workshop is presented in partnership with the Creative Learning Factory at the Ohio History Connection.

Register

Should We Create the Same Digital Archives for Different Audiences?

RL front screen

As a part-time history Ph.D. student embarking on my dissertation (while working full-time at Ford’s Theatre—indeed, I don’t sleep much), few things thrill me more than searching for digitized primary sources.

I tend to use loose search terms, as I know that many digitized collections have minimal metadata, and then sort through the results manually to find what I need.

Wearing either my academic or my museum professional hat, I’m the not-oft-stated but oft-implied audience for many collections databases. My many, many, many years of training (I’m in something like 23rd grade) have prepared me to separate the wheat from the chaff.

But what of users who haven’t gone through years of professional history and museum training, like K-12 teachers? Should we expect them to use an online archive in the same way?

Just as we wouldn’t run the same type of public program for academics as we would for K–12 teachers (I hope), we shouldn’t expect everyone else to use the same type of online platforms we create for use by academics and fellow museum professionals.

This was perhaps the biggest lesson that became clear to us at Ford’s Theatre as we planned our Remembering Lincoln Digital Collection, which launched in March 2015. After we identified four (in hindsight, overly broad) target audiences during the course of a planning meeting (teachers, students, enthusiasts and scholars), we began an audience evaluation process led by Conny Graft.

 

Both during the planning process and after launch, Ford’s Theatre conducted videoconference focus groups with teachers, enthusiasts and recent museum visitors.
Both during the planning process and after launch, Ford’s Theatre conducted videoconference focus groups with teachers, enthusiasts and recent museum visitors.

We conducted focus groups with teachers and enthusiasts, and surveys of teachers, enthusiasts and scholars.

Ultimately, we identified teachers and students as our most important long-term audiences. We realized that much of the interest from enthusiasts would coincide with the 150th anniversary of the Lincoln assassination, but teachers and students would have interest in this resource year in and year out.

Do busy teachers have the same interest that researchers like me do in sorting through reams of lightly-interpreted primary sources to find the right ones for their classes?

As they told us, and as research efforts by the Minnesota Historical Society have shown as well, not so much.

Rather, teachers understandably don’t have time to sift, and also indicated that they prefer for a subject expert to give recommendations.

So pursuant to this, we made sure that the website includes several features that add interpretation and context—something that took a lot of extra work, but that we would argue is worth the effort.

There is an interpretive section of the website, with a timeline (not always the best interpretive method, but in this case, a way to show events and related primary sources in time), a map that displays a selection of primary sources, and short biographies of featured people.

We have a set of thematic “curated collections” to give another entry point.

We worked with a group of teachers to create teaching modules—the teachers told us that they trusted lesson plans created by their fellow professionals, and not as much by museum staff.

We’ve also used a tagging system, which has sometimes broken down in spite of efforts to maintain a controlled vocabulary. We’re working with our web developer on replacing a free tagging system with check boxes.

We’ve also started working with classrooms on transcriptions, since many of the items in Remembering Lincoln are as yet un-transcribed.

We’ve also encouraged—not always successfully—our contributing institutions to add rich descriptions to their items. In a focus group after launch, teachers indicated a strong preference for items with more interpretation.

 

Diary of Sarah Gooll Putnam, a teenager living in Boston who drew the look on her face when her father told her of Lincoln’s assassination. As an adult, Putnam was a portrait painter. Massachusetts Historical Society.
Diary of Sarah Gooll Putnam, a teenager living in Boston who drew the look on her face when her father told her of Lincoln’s assassination. As an adult, Putnam was a portrait painter. Massachusetts Historical Society.

In the future, we’ll likely be going back to add richer metadata.

An important point about adding richer metadata: It takes a lot of time and counters the notion of “more product, less process” that is prevalent in archival work today. Instead of what others have told me is an average of 20-30 minutes per item, Jessica Ellison at the Minnesota Historical Society, who is preparing sets of richly-described primary sources for teachers, tells me she spends one to two hours per item, depending on how much research she needs to do.

But as Mike Lesperance, a principal at exhibition development firm The Design Minds (disclosure: where I formerly worked), put it to me in a recent conversation, interpreting collections items in this way is making them intellectually accessible to broader audiences. Isn’t that what we are supposed to do as educators?

In addition to curated sets of primary sources and rich metadata, our research and that of others also indicate that teachers are looking for variety.

This is one of the unresolved questions that we still have with Remembering Lincoln. In our collecting—not nearly finished (so if your institution has materials, please let me know!)—we have aimed, not always successfully, for geographic and ethnic diversity. Indeed, in the extensive audience research and interpretation process, building the collection was one of the aspects that suffered, although we have 693 items as of May 31.

Still, how do we reconcile the desire for a larger variety of items with the desire for a more curated focus? We haven’t quite cracked that nut. Any suggestions from others in the field are appreciated!

David McKenzie is Associate Director for Digital Resources in the Education Department at Ford’s Theatre. He also is currently a part-time History Ph.D. student at George Mason University, studying 19th-century U.S. and Latin American history, as well as digital history. Before coming to Ford’s in October 2013, he worked at the Jewish Historical Society of Greater WashingtonThe Design Minds, Inc. and the Alamo. Follow him on Twitter @dpmckenzie.


A New Twist on Hidden Curriculum

When I saw this blog, "8 Lessons about Teaching from the Canadian Museum of Human Rights History," on Art Museum Teaching, it really got me thinking about how our sites themselves can inspire teachers and what happens in the classroom.

human-rights-featured1

The exhibitions and programs at many of our sites strive to incorporate multiple perspectives of events in history. Through our collections we have a multitude of voices that can help personalize and place history in a local context.  We often do this through a variety of "ways of knowing," and I know at my site we use first-person interpretation quite a bit.

Of course, in response to the article I'm thinking about how we can work to help educators use those perspectives and different ways of knowing in their classrooms as they move away from textbook-driven education. But I'm also wondering what "hidden" lessons teachers take from the Indiana History Center.  I hope the liveliness of history and curiosity that it can inspire are some, but I look forward to talking with teachers about their insights, too.

What "hidden" lessons do you hope teachers take from your site and use as they are planning instruction?


Where are All the School Groups Part 2 -- Teachers

As mentioned in the last installment of this View from the Porch, teachers are the nut we need to crack in order to gain field trips.   This can be accomplished on a field trip, but that only proves you can talk to children - what about talking to adults.  Enter the Teacher Professional Development Opportunity.

Archaeology
Archaeology mini-dig boxes

The vast majority of teachers in America graduate from teacher training programs which means that they majored in teaching and pedagogy and educational theory...NOT in a content area like history or science.  They certify in the area they teach by taking additional coursework either at the graduate level or through workshops or both.  This is where historic sites and museums come in.

The big guys -- like the Smithsonian -- already offer training for teachers, but it's rare to find it at house museums and small museums.  You don't have to have a staff of thousands, or even dozens to pull it off.

  • First, figure out your strengths. What can YOU offer the teachers that they will enjoy learning? Try as much as possible to align it with your State Standards. Can't think of what to teach.  The Library of Congress has a workshop you can steal on Teaching with Primary Sources.  Check it out! http://www.loc.gov/teachers/tps/
  • Second, familiarize yourself with how teachers must maintain their certifications in your state -- usually a visit to your state's Department of Education website is a good place to start.  You must have your workshop approved through the State or local districts, so  verify how that process works.
  • Third, partner with a retired Master teacher, your state Humanities Council,  another museum or nature center, or all of the above.

    Educator learning about Monarch Butterflies -- up close!
    Educator learning about Monarch Butterflies -- up close!
  • Next design a workshop -- the more hands-on the better.  Advice to the newbie -- keep it short, 1 to 3 days unless you really have the staff and energy to do more.  Your curriculum should be hands-on (teachers don't like to be lectured to) and include lesson plans that can be picked up from your workshop and implemented immediately in the classroom.  Remember too, while your site may interpret (insert name of dead white guy here), that person/family did not live in a vacuum.  You CAN teach about science and technology as well as nature and history. Teaching about moon launches may not be appropriate for a Civil War site, but what about the medical advances of that time.
  • Then, write a grant to get it off the ground.  The grant can pay for supplies, like consumables, notebooks and flash drives for the teachers, honorarium for guest speakers, and even a field trip to take the teachers to visit another site.  Be sure to plan for food -- teachers will always come for good food.  When budgeting, keep the cost reasonable for the teachers, $100 or less depending upon the number of professional learning units you are offering.
  • Finally, advertise advertise advertise.  Refer to the View from the Porch on Field Trips for how to advertise directly (and for free) to teachers.

    Civil War "housewife" program

At our facility, we have two staff members, one summer intern and no volunteers.  Every summer we put on four weeks of summer day camps and four or five educator workshops.  I teach two of the workshops; co-teach a third workshop, and two workshops belong to other organizations, but they use our space and include our resources in their programs.  Once an educator signs up for one of our workshops he or she will generally attend them all and will begin booking field trips or out reach with us.  We have taken two of our workshops on the road for teacher in-service days, a service for which the schools/districts are happy to pay.

Educator workshops can be an entirely new avenue into the school district for you.  They are a way to reach new audiences.  And, they give you and your staff the opportunity to show what you know!

Michelle Zupan is the Curator & Director of Hickory Hill in Thomson, GA. She is the Chair of the AASLH Historic House Museums Committee

 


Where are the School Groups?

As the Curator/Director of a historic house in a small town, I hear the refrains of  "why don't the schools come visit us?," "where are the school groups?" all the time from other historic houses and traditional glass box history museums. When I inquire as to what they are offering the schools, the response, "we have all this STUFF."  Long gone are the days of build it and they will come when referring to school groups.  In fact and in practice, that ended in 2002 with the signing of the No Child Left Behind Act or NCLB.  Also known as teaching to the test.

Yes, there are ways to bring school groups and teachers back to your site.  Warning: it takes a bit of work and planning on your part!

We KNOW that not all states will invite in museum professionals to help write education standards, so we must nclbwork within the confines of those seemingly continuously changing requirements.  I work in Georgia and they do a fruit basket turnover of the standards about every 6 years.  This is a challenge when you have worked hard to develop programs aligned to the state standards and suddenly you are faced with a different set of standards that no longer fit your programs.  (BTW, this is entirely outside of the Common Core standards which are a different discussion.)

The remedy to this is to work with whomever develops school programs at your site (often that has been me) to spend a half a day making notes on the standards.  You will find the State Educational Standards on your State Department of Education website.  For example,  in 4th grade students  need to know 1) causes of the Civil War, 2) 3 major battles, 3) who were Lee and Grant.  Next comes some serious belly button studying and analysis -- how can our site fit in here -- what could we DO to help kids remember these facts.  Hmmm, let's see. If you have a site where slaves or, later, black servants worked, how about tackling the issue of slavery and the role of African-Americans in antebellum or post-bellum America during a tour?  Bingo, one standard down.

But what about science?  We can't dissect frogs in the mansion!  Noooo, but perhaps you have some technology Students from the Wellston Summer School Program examine a human brain.From right:Antoinette Stallings (holding brain)Kaela Brooks (pink shirt)Dwight Harkless (black shirt)that was new at the time the house was built.  Our house had a Delco light system. We can talk about electricity and how that changed American farming and lifeways.  How about telegrams? The telegraph was vitally important to communication at one time.  Corsets -- always a hit.  How did those impact human physiology, and interiors (think fainting sofas)?  Bingo, two standards down!

Be creative. Walk through your site, your collections, and your archives. You may not be able to serve every grade level this way, and that is OK. Be fantastic with 3rd grade standards, excel at meeting 8th grade standards. No one will fault you for not teaching American Revolution topics at a Civil War site (though in reality you probably can once you start digging).

The next way to reach back into the schools is directly through the teachers. This is a two-fold approach. sistine-chapel-michelangelo-paintings-6

First, once you have aligned your programs with the state standards advertise it to the teachers.  They are not going to come to you looking, you have to go to them. This is also easier than it sounds.  Don't bother contacting the Principal, or even the AP -- they don't forward emails or letters.  Spend a day data mining school websites to get the emails of teachers in the grades/subjects you are targeting. Craft a well-written email -- be brief -- outlining what you can do for the teacher and his/her students.  Don't waste time and money MAILING things. Teachers get sooooo much junk mail they toss most of it. Email Email Email. Only put about 6 to 10 addresses in the TO: box at a time so the school systems don't make you as a spammer.  Follow an initial email up with an email a month, even if it is only "Here's what we're up to this  month..," reiterate what you can do for them. Joel Chandler Harris

The second way to reach teachers is through Professional Development classes.  This sounds really scary if you've never presented or even attended one.  We will tackle this topic next week! Stay tuned.

Michelle Zupan is the Curator & Director of Hickory Hill in Thomson, GA. She is the Chair of the AASLH Historic House Museums Committee

 

 

 

 

 


AASLH Offering Two Programming Workshops in April

AASLH will offer two workshops in April, both on public programming.

Focusing On Visitors:
Public Programming & Exhibits At History Institutions

April 3-4, 2014
Governor John Langdon House, Historic New England,
Portsmouth, NH

This workshop provides a broad overview of public programming and exhibits focusing on active learning at different kinds of history organizations. Seasoned educators direct conversations about museum education and what it is museum educators do. Participants will leave the workshop with information and materials they can take back to their organizations to adapt and use!

  • Cost: $270 members/$345 nonmembers
  • $40 discount if fee is received by February 27
Register Now

Connecting Your Collections To Teachers And Students
April 10-11, 2014
Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH
Sponsored by: The Creative Learning Factory

Through a combination of presentations, discussions, hands-on activities, and take-home materials, this workshop addresses the various elements of museum education and program planning needed to create an engaging, educational, and successful program with a focus on collections-based programming. Topics include learning styles, presentation strategies, audience types, planning strategies and program assessment, using research, training staff, and crafting programming that is meaningful to the education community.

  • Cost: $270 members/$345 nonmembers
  • $40 discount if fee is received by March 6
 Register Now

 


A Little Help from Our Friends: AASLH Technical Leaflets

bonnetThe key reason we named our original Educators and Interpreters blog "Arrrrducation"* was because, as a whole, museum educators love to beg, borrow and steal good ideas. Well, it's not quite stealing, since we are also prone to share, share, share!  I love this so much about our community. We are creative thinkers whose love for sharing good ideas predates the term "open-source" by, well, a lot.

My case in point: AASLH Technical Leaflets. Since the 1960s, museum professionals have been sharing their expertise through these clear and succinct how-to guides. I have found them immensely helpful in my career, and I thought I would write a post that pulls together all the technical leaflets related to museum education throughout AALSH history! (Ok, maybe not the whole history. I am specifically sharing the leaflets that YOU can check out and purchase directly from the AASLH website.)

You do not need to be an AASLH Institutional or Individual Member to view the list, but you save money if you are. (Not a member? Click HERE to join!) If you ever needed a reason to join, there it is!

Visit the Online Bookstore and browse Technical Leaflets or Search Interests and input Education, Interpretation (I've prepopulated a search on those terms for you). Most leaflets are available in hard copy or as a PDF download.

So, here they are, in numerical (and date, mostly) order from most recent to oldest.

  • TL 262 - How to Plan and Implement Interpretation - June 2013
  • TL 259 - Creating Intergenerational Oral History Opportunities - August 2012
  • TL 255 - Interpreting Difficult Knowledge - Summer 2011
  • TL254 - Designing Education Programs that Connect Students to Collections - Spring 2011
  • TL 245 -Families First! Rethinking Exhibits to Engage All Ages - Winter 2009
  • TL 239 - Courts in the Classroom: Educational Outreach Through the Web - October 2007
  • TL 238 - Thinking Evaluatively: A Practical Guide to Integrating the Visitor Voice - August 2007
  • TL 236 - From Levittown to Leave it to Beaver: Interpreting Mid-Twentieth Century Suburbia - May 2007
  • TL 235 - Reaching Teachers: Marketing Museum Education in the Twenty-First Century - March 2007
  • TL 231 - Proprietors of the Bat and the Ball: Interpreting the National Pastime and its Predecessor Games - August 2005
  • TL 230 - Designing a Summer Teacher Institute - May 2005
  • TL 227 - Theater 101 for Historical Interpretation - Summer 2004
  • TL 222 - Telling the Story: Better Interpretation at Small Historical Organizations - 2003
  • TL 204 - Charting the Impact of Museum Exhibitions and Programs - 1999
  • TL 202 - Developing Effective Educational Programs - 1998
  • TL 197 - Interpreting Foodways - 1997
  • TL 194 - Historic Walking Tours - 1996
  • TL 186 - Reaching Teachers: Helping Them Teach State and Local History - 1993
  • TL 184 - Student Projects and Internships in a Museum Setting - 1993
  • TL 146 - Planning and Connecting Successful Seminars and Workshops - 1983
  • TL 125 - Training Docents: How to Talk to Visitors - 1980
  • TL 123 - Using Oral History for a Family History Project - 1980
  • TL 120 - Evaluating Historical Photographs - 1979
  • TL 117 - Craft Festivals: A Planning Guide - 1979
  • TL 105 - Historic Houses as Learning Laboratories - 1978
  • TL 93 - Planning Museum Tours for School Groups - 1977
  • TL 91 - Seven Ways to Look at an Artifact - 1976
  • TL 65 - Volunteer Docent Programs: Programmatic Approach to Museum Interpretation - 1973
  • TL 44 - Organizing a Junior Society - 1972
  • TL 38 - History for Young People - 1966
  • TL 32 - Historic Site Interpretation: The Human Approach - 1965
  • TL 29 - Reaching Your Public: Turning Travelers into Visitors - 1965
  • TL 25 - Planning Tours for Your Historical Society - 1965
  • TL 19 - Historic Site Interpretation: The Student Field Trip - 1971
  • TL 16 - School Loan Exhibits for the Local Historical Society - 1971

Recently, I found TL254 - Designing Education Programs that Connect Students to Collections to be particularly helpful to me.  Our digital collection has just exceeded 20,000 items, and I was a bit baffled as to how I could get teachers and students to see it as a resource.  This leaflet helped me develop the outcomes I wanted, and from there, the planning came together.

Have you found these, or any other technical leaflets to be helpful?  Are there any that you find valuable that aren't on my list?  Add them in the comments section!

 

*We've since renamed our blog The Inkwell which is a bit less obtuse than our original, brilliant naming convention, don't you think? 


Teachers and Technology

Our friend Jamie Glavic of the Museum Minute blog posted some insight into two Twitter chats she's scheduled for weekly : #edutues on Tuesday afternoons, hosted by@QueensMuseum (Queens Museum of Art ) and #mpossible, led by @SIEdLab (Smithsonian EdLab) on Thursday afternoons at 4pm.

Her words offer some insight and questions that we know vex museum educators and interpreters the world over:

More often than not...the role of technology in education – and highlighted the museum experience – is brought up. How do we help teachers? How do we create the best educational experiences possible? How do we make the information gained on a tour of our museum last long after the bus pulls away?

When I think about how we use technology in our education programs, I often immediately think of this famous quote from Apollo 13 , "Failure is not an option." Neither is technology.

Read Jamie's full blog here.