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Webinar: Writing for History Publications

Every project has a story, and the field want to hear yours! Public history publications offer a way to share your research and experiences with others, gather feedback from across the field, and make connections for future partnerships. But how do you get started? Join editors from AASLH, NCPH, and Nursing Clio to learn about sharing your work through magazines, journals, and blogs. We’ll cover the basics of submitting work to History News, the AASLH blog, The Public Historian, History@Work, and the Nursing Clio blog, with tips on choosing your platform and focus.

Readers across the country look to public history publications to gain ideas and inspiration for their own work, so sharing new techniques, hidden history, and challenges and opportunities in digital or hardcopy print is essential for a diverse and thriving field. Join us to find out how you can become a resource for the field and share your public history work by writing for history publications.

Details:

DATE: May 30, 2019

TIME: 3:00 – 4:15 pm EASTERN (Remember to adjust for your time zone!)

COST: $40 Members of AASLH and NCPH (NCPH members should contact NCPH for a discount code) / $65 Nonmembers

Closed captioning available upon advanced notice. Please contact flammia@aaslh.org for more information.

REGISTER HERE

Description and Outcomes:

Participant Outcomes:

  • Learn about different kinds and requirements of publishing opportunities
  • Understand publishing outlets are accessible and that writing about public history is not just for professors, senior level folks, etc.
  • Know their work matters, and the field benefits when it hears from diverse voices outside the usual crowd
  • Be inspired to share to share their research on publishing outlets discussed

Speakers:

Sarah Handley-Cousins, Editor of Nursing ClioSarah Case, Managing Editor of The Public HistorianNicole Belolan, Co-Editor of The Public HistorianJohn Marks, Editor of History News, and Aja Bain, AASLH blog editor and Associate Editor of History News. Each brings a unique perspective on the world of history publications and the process for writers, which we look forward to having them share as presenters in this webinar.

Partner:

AASLH has partnered with the National Council on Public History (NCPH) to produce this webinar. NCPH members can contact their membership organization and request a promo code to receive discounted pricing on this webinar.


U.S. 250, Career Diversity, and Other Takeaways from the AHA Annual Meeting

Last week, I had the opportunity to attend the American Historical Association’s annual meeting as thousands of historians braved the bitterly cold temperatures and biting winds to convene in Washington, D.C. This year, the meeting helped me step back and think broadly about the wide variety of ways people can “do” history and the opportunities for professionals engaged in diverse ways with the historical enterprise to improve our communication and cooperation.

The main reason I went was to attend the meeting of the National Coalition for History’s Policy Board to discuss ongoing planning for the nation’s 250th (add ‘semiquincentennial’ to your spell check now, folks) anniversary. The Coalition serves as a central advocacy shop for history organizations, and its policy board brings together the leaders of some of the nation’s most prominent history associations and societies, including the American Historical Association, Organization of American Historians, National Council on Public History, AASLH, and several others. In addition to discussing a range of topics affecting history organizations nationwide, we spent time thinking big as we all continue to prepare for the U.S. 250th.

Over the past several months, AASLH has begun some preliminary work in planning for the 250th, bringing together a task force and advisory committee that includes representatives from institutions around the country. As multiple national semiquincentennial commemorative initiatives have emerged over the past several months, one of the aims of the AASLH task force and advisory committees is to think broadly about how the field can approach this anniversary, developing a framework that can help align the activities of the many individuals and institutions involved in various commemoration efforts.

Discussing the 250th with this coalition made clear for me the significant opportunities available for collaboration between associations and institutions working in various sectors of the history community, but particularly between the public and academic history worlds. Just as history associations and societies representing diverse professional and scholarly interests mutually support the National Coalition for History to advocate for the benefit of the history field as a whole, so too does the 250th anniversary represent a unique opportunity for collaboration across the lines that artificially divide the history community.

Beyond the U.S. 250, this Annual Meeting helped me recognize the many opportunities out there for public and academic historians to collaborate more productively. Having attended several AHA meetings in the past— in my former life as an academic— I was struck this year by what seemed like a stronger and more widespread focus on how historians and scholars across the field can more effectively reach the public—from improving communications through traditional and digital media to the AHA’s increasing emphasis on career diversity.

In all, the meeting inspired me to think anew about the ways history professionals—and the associations representing its various sectors—might better collaborate to better serve both the public and the field. After a weekend in which lots of people were thinking creatively and ambitiously about the future of the past, I am re-energized to continue developing these ideas in the months and years ahead.


AASLH Annual Meeting: Call for Posters 2016

This year the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) is holding our annual meeting in partnership with the Michigan Museums Association in Detroit, MI, on September 14-17. We are proud to be working with the National Council on Public History (NCPH) who is sponsoring the poster session at our meeting for the fourth year. This presents an excellent opportunity for students, project leaders, and small museums to share their work with fellow public historians and to discover what their peers are doing. We want to make sure that you do not miss the opportunity to participate.

The poster session format is for sharing visual or material evidence, engaging in one-on-one discussions about your project, IMG_6617and soliciting feedback about works-in-progress.

It’s also a great, low-pressure way to participate in a conference for the first time.

The Annual Meeting theme is “The Spirit of Rebirth,” and the poster session will be at the Cobo Center on Friday, September 16. Proposals are due June 1.  Poster session proposals must be submitted electronically in one PDF document and must include your contact information, a short abstract describing your project, a one-page C.V., and a mock-up of your proposed poster. IMG_6641For more details about the submission process and requirements, please carefully review the Call for Posters.

Whether you’re finishing up a project and want to share your conclusions or you’re partway through and looking for thoughts on where to go from here, the NCPH-sponsored poster session is an ideal format for students who want to get on the program at a national conference. We encourage you to submit a proposal.

UPDATE: Submission deadline has been extended to Friday, June 10!


Call for Posters 2015

This year the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) is holding our annual meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, on September 16-19. We are proud to be working with NCPH who is sponsoring the poster session at our meeting for the third year running. This presents an excellent opportunity for students in particular to share their work with fellow public historians and to discover the work their peers are doing, and we want to make sure that you do not miss the opportunity to participate.

poster session

The poster session format is an excellent forum for sharing visual or material evidence, engaging in one-on-one discussions about your project, and soliciting feedback about works-in-progress. It’s also a great, low-pressure way to participate in a conference for the first time.

The Annual Meeting theme is “The Power of Possibility,” and the poster session will be at the Louisville Marriott Downtown on Friday, September 18. Proposals are due June 8.  Poster session proposals must be submitted electronically in one PDF document and must include your contact information, a short abstract describing your project, a one-page C.V., and a mock-up of your proposed poster. For more details about the submission process and requirements, please carefully review the Call for Posters at http://ncph.org/cms/wp-content/uploads/CALL-FOR-NCPH-POSTERS-2015.pdf.

Whether you’re finishing up a project and want to share your conclusions or you’re partway through and looking for thoughts on where to go from here, the NCPH-sponsored poster session is an ideal format for students who want to get on the program at AASLH. We encourage you to submit a proposal by June 8.


AASLH Presents First Joint Video with NCPH and Institute of Oral History

AASLH, the National Council on Public History (NCPH), and the Institute of Oral History, are pleased to present our first joint video, "Tips for Getting a Job in the Public History field."

The video was filmed at the 2014 AASLH Annual Meeting in St. Paul Minnesota. Featured in the video are AASLH Council members Linnea Grim and Ken Turino and AASLH members/volunteers Mari Carpenter and Tim Grove.
http://vimeo.com/113961817


No More Generic Lady of the House

It’s Women’s History Month, and the question begs to be asked: How well does your organization interpret women’s history? If you are the Emily Dickinson Museum or the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House, then the answer should be pretty well. But the majority of historic sites are not centered on the life of an individual women or cause. What other options are available for interpreting women’s history?

A recent post on the NCPH blog - Telling Real Women’s Stories by Molly Brookfield – makes a compelling argument that many museums and sites don’t tell women’s history very well:

“…. though there are many historic sites that include women’s experiences in their interpretation, too often they do so with broad brushstrokes, choosing stereotypes and generalizations over the experiences of the actual women.”

Reading that, I immediately thought of my days working as a volunteer coordinator at a historic home in Maryland that was guilty of exactly that offense. While the house was owned for many years by two sisters, the interpretation was stuck in the early 1800s and The Young Republic. They even got to say they had a chair George Washington sat in during a visit.

Brookfield goes on to challenge historic homes to research the real women that lived there, or the real women in the communities, and how those stories can be brought in to the interpretation of the home. I certainly would welcome a “No More Generic Lady of the House” campaign.

As the field continues to build on the model of the 21st Century Museum, museums and sites can connect the past to the present. The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center not only preserves and interprets the life of a historical person, it uses that person to effect change in today’s time. On the home page is their call to action:

“Stowe wrote the anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, in 1852. The world was never the same. Abolition became possible. Emancipation became law. But today, in the 21st century, inequity is everywhere. What would Stowe do? What will YOU do?”

The center is a wonderful example of how a historical organization can create civic capital – what I call the measurement of an institution’s civic worth and contribution to society. Using Stowe’s life and work as a starting point, they conquer issues facing us today, including poverty, human trafficking, education, and health care. This is another great and rewarding way sites can use the life of a real historical woman.

Thinking more strategically, women’s history month doesn’t have to be only about when programs occur. Use the month for planning purposes. Make a note that every March staff reviews the interpretation program that involves women. Update the plan with any new research that came out the past year on women in your community or time period. Museums and sites should consider themselves a clearinghouse of information. If new research came out that is relevant or would enhance your visitor experience, you should share that with your audience. Just because your collection is in the past, doesn’t mean your interpretation should be.

And remember, women’s history should be built in year round. March is just when we have a Megaphone!

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Rebecca Price is Director of Marketing at AASLH and the founder of Chick History.